Preschool through 8th grade: Where do things stand?

Screenshot 2017-06-18 at 12.29.22 PM

Since my preschool diagnosis of sensory processing disorder and the completion of eighth grade means about 10 years have passed, I thought I would do a review of how things have progressed. I’m looking to address these questions:

  • What areas seemed to have improved?
  • Have I grown out of anything?
  • What am I still struggling with?
  • Has anything new developed?

If you missed my big rundown of sensory issues, you can find it here. And don’t worry, throughout this list, there will be links back to appropriate blog posts to offer further explanation. 

Continue reading “Preschool through 8th grade: Where do things stand?”

How this writer got her start

readingtoclass

Teachers are sneaky about finding ways to get students familiar with talking in front of the class.

In kindergarten, first grade and maybe even second grade, it’s disguised as show and tell. You’re bringing in an item from home that you love and talking about it. Early on, teachers emphasize the importance of sharing what you love.

That’s public speaking in its purest form. Eye contact isn’t evaluated as much and neither is the smoothness of your delivery. You’re just sharing to the best of your ability.

So those are good building blocks that progress through each grade level.

Continue reading “How this writer got her start”

All twisted up with learning cursive

Screenshot 2017-05-08 at 11.58.20 AM

Last year, I had an opportunity to write about my experience with sensory processing disorder. It was an in-depth piece with a broad overview of the symptoms and characteristics that I encountered, as well as areas where I continue to struggle. This is the raw, unedited version of how I began that piece, a snapshot of my classroom experience with learning to write in cursive.

Continue reading “All twisted up with learning cursive”

Plea to teachers: Be patient with questions

eeb1b8e9fdd68baeb5382e67ece5b7dfba5c9e49089cedff0c7e2262557370cc

Every teacher has a moment at least once a day when a student asks a question about something that has just been explained, and the teacher’s natural reaction is “Weren’t you listening?”

Asking questions in class and seeking clarification is scary. At some point, a person gets ridiculed for asking. Maybe it seems like poor timing, even in a situation like this:

Teacher: (wrapping up a long discussion of what to expect and what sections to review) The test will be Friday. … (Brief pause) … Any questions?

Student: When’s the test?

I know it seems easy to write off a scenario like this as the kid zoned out or was clearly not paying attention. I’m sure there are ways of judging that.

Continue reading “Plea to teachers: Be patient with questions”

Around the world in 15 minutes: The importance of goal setting

In second grade we were learning our multiplication tables. I believe we covered 0 x 0 through 12 x 12. But we weren’t simply learning these answers. Our teacher wanted it to become second nature, so you could see the combination and instantly rattle off the answer. Yes, it has tremendous real-life applications, but for students with learning disabilities, it’s a bit more difficult.

We had these quick tests where we had to solve 20 to 30 problems within a minute. Well it wasn’t simply testing your knowledge of the material but how quickly you could recall it. If your brain has trouble relaying information in time, quick recall isn’t going to be a strong suit. Those tests were more anxiety-inducing for me than demonstrating academic mastery.

Continue reading “Around the world in 15 minutes: The importance of goal setting”

Celebrate the kindergarten graduation!

image

I’m detouring a little here but not really. There are entries I’ve been working on but they aren’t quite ready yet. So here is something new at least.

I’m wrapping up a second round of physical therapy this week. Round one was to help build up muscle strength after I fractured my right ankle in September. Round two began after I pulled something in my left knee about 6 weeks ago.

In physical therapy yesterday I overheard the trainer and another client talking. I don’t remember how they got on this topic but they mentioned a parent needing to attend a child’s graduation from kindergarten. Neither of those talking has kids. Their reaction was not friendly. “Graduation from what?”

They see coloring and playing. They might even see this as a time of kids goofing off. What is there to celebrate? Why are you making a big deal out of it when there is so much more ahead?

Continue reading “Celebrate the kindergarten graduation!”